Keola Beamer :

USA (Management, Inquiries, Music Licensing / U.S. & Foreign Rights) Starscape Music
P.O. Box 11089
Lahaina, HI 96761
tel (406) 225-5302
email: info@kbeamer.com

USA (Booking)
Herschel Freeman Agency, Inc.
7684 Apahon Lane Germantown, TN 38138
tel (901) 757-4567
fax (901) 757-5424
email:herschelfreeman

JAPAN & ASIA (Booking)
Mr. Takeo Sakurai
Noback Japan
2-17-7-3F Minami-cho, Kokubunji-city
Tokyo, Japan 1850021
tel (042) 359-7630
fax (042) 323-2876
email: sakurai@noback.co.jp

EUROPE & OTHER DESTINATIONS (Booking)
Starscape Music
P.O. Box 11089 Lahaina, HI 96761
tel (406) 225-5302
email: info@kbeamer.com


Raiatea Helm:

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Inā (Imagine)
(John Lennon - Lenono.Music/SBK Blackwood) 4:02

Inā ʻaʻohe lani Imagine there’s no heaven
He maʻalahi nō It’s easy if you try
ʻAʻohe lua ahi No hell below us
He lewa wale nō Above us only sky
Inā lā hoʻi kākou Imagine all the people
I kēia lā wale nō… Living for today…

Inā aupuni ʻole Imagine there’s no countries
He maʻalahi pū It isn’t hard to do
ʻAʻohe puʻumake Nothing to kill or die for
Hoʻomana ʻole pū And no religion too
Inā lā hoʻi kākou Imagine all the people
I ka malu o ke ao… Living life in peace…

He moemoeā kēia You may say I’m a dreamer
ʻAʻole naʻu wale nō But I’m not the only one
E hui pū nō kākou I hope someday you’ll join us
(I hoʻokahi ko ke ao a pau) And the world will be as one

Inā ua waiwai ʻole Imagine no possessions
A ua hiki nō I wonder if you can
ʻAʻohe lā pōloli No need for greed or hunger
Pili kaʻana pū A brotherhood of man
Inā lā hoʻi kākou Imagine all the people
Aloha a launa pū… Sharing all the world...

He moemoeā kēia You may say I’m a dreamer
ʻAʻole naʻu wale nō But I’m not the only one
E hui pū nō kākou I hope someday you’ll join us
(A noho pū ko ke ao a pau) And the world will live as one

 

Arrangement: Keola Beamer & Marsha Schweitzer
Hawaiian: Kaliko Beamer-Trapp
Vocals, Kī Hōʻalu Guitar (Leonard’s F): Keola Beamer
Vocals: Raiatea Helm
Oli (chant), Pahu, Pūniu: Charles Kaʻupu
ʻŪkēkē: Moanalani Beamer
Bass: John Kolivas
Winds: Spring Wind Quintet

Keola first performed “Inā/Imagine” with Raiatea on May 27, 2008 at the Shinnyo-en/Nā Lei Aloha Foundation’s “Diversity Harmony Peace” event in Waikīkī the day after the annual lantern floating ceremony. In planning the event, friend Cary Hayashikawa had asked Keola if he could perform it, so Keola began to think of how to give the song a Hawaiian feel. After the translation into Hawaiian language was completed by Keola’s hānai (adoptive) brother on May 5, just three weeks before its scheduled premier, Keola called on the talented members of the Spring Wind Quintet to provide a supportive background. Finally adding Moanalani’s steady ʻūkēkē rhythm to tie it all together, they felt that that “Imagine - Hawaiian style” was ready for its debut.

In this recording, Raiatea and Keola share the Hawaiian and English lyrics, and Charles Kaʻupu, a respected Maui-based chanter, hula exponent, and composer, offers an oli (chant) interlude in which he speaks of love and aloha for the islands, the mountains, and the seas. He admonishes us: “Arise and stand together, all children of the land.”

As Keola said at the time of its first performance, there is a kind of a timelessness to “Imagine” that serves to make it as relevant in today’s world as it was when Lennon penned it almost four decades ago.

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Where I Hold You
(Keola Beamer - Starscape Music/ASCAP) 3:59

I ka pilina muliwai Down where the river meets the sea
Ka ulu hau o kahakai When I was watching from the trees
He haliʻa mai na ka makani In the falling wind I was back again
A pili me ʻoe To where I hold you

E huli aku ana au Needing something to believe
I ala e hui hou ai I fixed a place inside of me
He mēheuheu, he maʻawe lā Where each old worn path
A pili me ʻoe Would lead me back to where I hold you

Where I hold you
Where I hold you
Where I hold you

Ua hoʻi aku nei nō And though you’re gone without a trace
Aia naʻe i ka puʻuwai In my heart there is a place
Kou leo hone mai i ka makani Where I still hear your voice in the falling wind
A pili me ʻoe Where I hold you

 

Arrangement: Keola Beamer & Marsha Schweitzer
Hawaiian: Kaliko Beamer-Trapp
Vocals, Kī Hōʻalu Guitar (Keola’s C tuned down ½ step to the key of B): Keola Beamer
Vocals: Raiatea Helm
Piano: Geoffrey Keezer
Bass: Marc Van Wageningon
Drums: Paul Van Wageningon
Winds: Spring Wind Quintet

The inspiration for the message of this song was the passing of “Papa” Kealiʻinohopono Beamer (Keola’s grandfather) in 1992. Keola explains: “‘Where I Hold You’ was written for that special place in your heart where you hold a memory of somebody.” Indeed, the soft yet thematic countermelodies of the wind instruments, the punctuation of the piano and guitar, and Raiatea’s strong leading vocals all build together to instill in us a faith that we can indeed hold the memories of those who have gone before us forever in our hearts and minds, and that if we take the time to listen, their voices may be heard amongst the trees and in the winds.

As Raiatea sang this, she thought of her t_ūtū (grandmother) who had passed: “It gets so strong, and I go into that place where it’s so deep where I want to cry, but I don’t want to cry yet. You miss someone so much you want to cry - but just before that is where you stop. You have to put yourself in that place to perform this kind of song. It lets you feel the mana (spiritual power) in the music.”

“Where I Hold You” echoes the collaborative relationship of Raiatea and Keola in their work together. “This song captures a lot about what I do with Uncle Keola and where I hold this music, this gift, this journey,” says Raiatea.

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Our Time For Letting Go
(Keola Beamer - Starscape Music/ASCAP) 4:11

Out into the wind, I watch the setting sun 
And I remember you
And when the night comes in, and the day is gone
I remember you

When the clouds appear and the wind grows cold
I’m missing you so much, it’s time to let you go

A time for love, a time for letting go
And time for all the small regrets to pass
A time for love, and time for letting go of the past
Our time for letting go … for letting go

When the sun goes down and the wind grows cold
And we feel so lost, we don’t know where to go

A time for love, a time for letting go,
And time for all the small regrets to pass
A time to heal, and time for letting go of the past
Our time for letting go … for letting go

Underneath the moon, I see the starlight shine
And I remember you

When the clouds appear and the wind grows cold
I’m missing you so much, it’s time to let you go

A time for love, a time for letting go
And time for all the small regrets to pass
A time for love, and time for letting go of the past
Our time for letting go

 

Arrangement: Keola Beamer
Vocals, Kī Hōʻalu Guitar (DADGAD tuning): Keola Beamer
Piano: Geoffrey Keezer
Bass: Marc Van Wageningon
Drums: Paul Van Wageningon

“For my mother, Winona Kapuailohiamanonokalani Desha Beamer, who left us in early 2008.”

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You Somebody
(Keola Beamer - Starscape Music/ASCAP) 3:42

In this world we all live a busy life
Filled with work, with compromise and sacrifice
When you’re feeling lonely and you’re having a hard time
There’s someone who believes in you and knows one day you’ll shine

’Cause you somebody, you somebody
You somebody in this heart of mine

In this world we all do the best we can
We try so hard to write our names into the sand 
Maybe you’re not famous and no one knows your name
There’s someone who believes in you and that will never change

’Cause you somebody, you somebody
You somebody in this heart of mine

Oh how quickly the time goes, and soon we are gone
Still I’d wish that you’d know that you are never lost

’Cause you somebody, you somebody
You somebody in this heart of mine
You somebody …

Time moves on and another day begins
And your hopes, like leaves, are blowing in the wind
Feeling disappointed cause you’ve struggled long and hard
There’s someone who’s in love with you just the way you are

’Cause you somebody, you somebody
You somebody in this heart of mine

 

Arrangement: Keola Beamer
Vocals: Raiatea Helm
Kī Hōʻalu Guitar (Leonard’s F): Keola Beamer
Piano: Geoffrey Keezer
Bass: Marc Van Wageningon
Drums: Paul Van Wageningon

Diamond Head Theatre in Honolulu first commissioned the Pidgin-English musical “You Somebody” by author and playwright Lee Cataluna in 2002. Lee asked Keola to write the music. “You Somebody” debuted to sold-out audiences in 2002 and was re-mounted in 2007. “Working with Lee was a wonderful experience,” says Keola. “It was both evocative and tremendously fun at the same time. Having my beautiful hānai niece (Raiatea) sing a great version of it is a true gift.”

Raiatea says it was “like magic” working with piano virtuoso Geoffrey Keezer on this recording. “He’s a wonderful guy and an excellent musician,” she says. “And like Uncle Keola told me, every producer, every engineer, every musician you work with makes for a different sound. Keola is very serious and a perfectionist when it comes to this kind of stuff. So he and Geoffrey really get along well!”

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Hilo Hanakahi
(Keola Nāumu - Charles E. King Music Co.) 3:46

Arrangement: Keola Beamer
Vocals, ʻUkulele: Raiatea Helm
Vocals, Kī Hōʻalu Guitar (Leonard’s F): Keola Beamer

Hilo Hanakahi is a well known composition which honors each district of Hawaiʻi island by recounting popular epithets for each, such as the flower-rustling Kanilehua rain of Hilo district, the dust-raising Kuehulepo wind of Kaʻū, the whispering sea of Kawaihae, and the tall cliffs of Hāmākua. Keola and Raiatea present a part of this long composition, here honoring Hilo, Kona, Kawaihae, and Hilo’s ancient chief, Hanakahi.

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I Kīlohi Aku Au
(When I Look In Your Eyes)
(Leslie Bricusse - EMI Hastings/BMI) 3:28

I kilohi aku au When I look in your eyes
I kou maka nō ka ʻike o ke ao I see the wisdom of the world in your eyes
A me ka luhi o ka nui kupae I see the sadness of a thousand goodbyes
I kilohi aku au When I look in your eyes

Pūʻiwa ʻole mai And it is no surprise
Ke onaona o ka pō mahina lā To see the softness of the moon in your eyes
ʻŌlinolino me nā hōkū o ka pō The gentle sparkle of the stars in the skies
I kilohi aku au When I look in your eyes

Kou maka nō In your eyes
Ka hohonu o ke kai I see the deepness of the sea
Ka nui o ke aloha mai I see the deepness of the love
Ko aloha nō e aloha ai The love I feel you feel for me

Ma nā kau a kau Autumn comes summer dies
Ka puni o nā makahiki hou I see the passing of the years in your eyes
A haʻalele nō, lele ʻole ka uē kupae And when we part there’ll be no tears, no goodbyes
(E kilohi aku au) I’ll just look in your eyes

Kou maka ʻālohi, aia i ka poli Those eyes so wise, so warm, so real
(Aloha nui i ke ao e ʻikea ʻia nei) How I love the world your eyes reveal

 

Arrangement: Keola Beamer
Hawaiian: Kaliko Beamer-Trapp
Vocals: Raiatea Helm
Kī Hōʻalu Guitar (Keola’s G minor played in E): Keola Beamer
Siter: Harry Willemsen

Keola met Indonesian musician, Harry Willemsen, in Den Haag, Amsterdam in 2005. The two musicians brought together the unusual combination of Hawaiian slack key guitar and Javanese gamelan orchestra while both were performing at the annual Pasar Malam Besar Indonesian Festival. Four years later, their musical friendship still strong, Keola invited Harry to perform with him on this piece. He felt that underneath Raiatea’s voice, the tonal palette of the Indonesian siter would evoke the appropriate sadness needed for “When I Look In Your Eyes.”

The song came originally from the 1967 Oscar-winning musical film “Doctor Dolittle” starring actor Rex Harrison. It was written by British lyricist and composer Leslie Bricusse. Of the song, Keola says, “I always thought this song had such beautiful ideas: of getting older in life, of the passing of years, of the ‘thousand goodbyes’, and I had been wanting to find a treatment of my own.”

“When Raiatea approaches a difficult song, such as this one, I know it’s not easy. We would sit for hours and work on this piece. She had to reach inside to illuminate complex emotions. That’s another reason I respect her. She has the courage to explore her own heart. In my experience, that does not happen easily. She was able to convey a gentle sensitivity because I think she was able to call on that ‘older soul’ ever-present within her.

“I will always cherish the experience,” Keola says reflectively, “of working with her.”

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Ka Makani Kāʻili Aloha
(Mathew Kāne) 3:38

Arrangement: Keola Beamer
Vocals, Kī Hōʻalu Guitar (DADGAD tuning): Keola Beamer
Vocals, ʻUkulele: Raiatea Helm
Bass: John Kolivas
Congas: Bobo Butires

“Ka Makani Kāʻili Aloha” (literally meaning “the love-snatching wind”) is a song Keola learned while a student at Kamehameha Schools. It is a song of love and praise that has been a familiar part of Hawaiian music since the early 1920s. The song reminds us of how love lost can be found again with patience, prayer, and unwavering devotion.

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Ke Kulu o ke Au
(Who Knows Where The Time Goes)
(Sandy Denny - Irving Music, Inc./Winckler Musikforlag/BMI) 3:31

E haʻalele aku ana nō Across the evening sky
Nā manu o ke ahiahi All the birds are leaving
Pehea lā e ʻike ai But how can they know
Ka wā e lele aku ai? It’s time for them to go?
I mua o ke kapuahi Before the winter fire
Eia ke moeā nei I will still be dreaming
Mea ʻole nō ke au I have no thought of time

Iā wai lā ka ʻike? For who knows where the time goes?
Iā wai ka ʻike i ke kulu o ke au? Who knows where the time goes?

Mehameha ua kahakai Sad deserted shore
ʻAʻohe ou hoaloha Your fickle friends are leaving
He ʻike nō naʻe kou Ah, but then you know
E hoʻi aku ana nō It’s time for them to go
Eia mai ana au But I will still be here
Kololani ʻole I have no thought of leaving
Helu ʻole i ke au I do not count the time

Iā wai lā ka ʻike? For who knows where the time goes?
Iā wai ka ʻike i ke kulu o ke au? Who knows where the time goes?

Mehameha ʻole hoʻi au And I am not alone
ʻOiai he ipo i ʻaneʻi While my love is near me
A pēia aku ana nō I know it will be so
A haʻalele aku Until it’s time to go
Kau a hoʻoilo mai So come the storms of winter
Nā manu kupulau And then the birds in spring again
Makaʻu ʻole i ke au I have no fear of time

Iā wai lā ka ʻike? For who knows where the time goes?
Iā wai ka ʻike i ke kulu o ke au? Who knows where the time goes?

 

Arrangement: Keola Beamer & Marsha Schweitzer
Hawaiian: Kaliko Beamer-Trapp
Vocals, Kī Hōʻalu Guitar (Leonard’s F tuned down to the Key of Eb): Keola Beamer
Vocals: Raiatea Helm
Kāʻekeʻeke:  Moanalani Beamer
Winds: Spring Wind Quintet

The ballad “Who Knows Where The Time Goes” was originally written circa 1967 by Sandy Denny, a young English singer-songwriter. She was 20 years old when she recorded the song as a private demo, her plaintive voice, simple slack-key-sounding accompaniment, and unforgettable chorus underlining for the listener questions of the meaning of life and the inevitability of time’s procession. Although her song went on to find life in the voices of many artists through the following decades, Denny was not to appreciate the greater part of its success: she passed away following a tragic accident at the age of 31.

For Keola’s good friend and arranger/musician Marsha Schweitzer, arranging the wind instruments for this piece was “no ordinary experience.” At the close of an inspirational week-long trip to Maui in late 2009, the arrangement quite literally came to her “mai ka lani mai” (from the heavens). The flute, clarinet, oboe, horn, and bassoon are tied to the words of the song: the light movements of the flute symbolize the birds in the first verse; the desolate and then warm sounds of the clarinet in the second verse portray the awakening of the conscience of the poet to her situation in life; and the third verse’s oboe and horn herald the ultimate triumph of love over fear. “The whole spectrum of what happened in the process of making this arrangement was very spiritual, and helped to make this piece truly Hawaiian.”

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Ke Aliʻi Hulu Mamo
(Helen Desha Beamer) 4:21

Koʻiʻi ka lehua i ke anu Refreshed is the lehua in the chill

Kīpuʻupuʻu aʻo Waimea Kīpuʻupuʻu of Waimea

Hanohano ia hale o ka manu Glorious, this home of the bird
Hulu ʻēʻē aʻo Mealani Underwing feathers for the Royal One

A he manu i kūlia i ka nuʻu As a bird strives to reach the summit
Ka ʻōʻō hae a ke kia manu So the ʻōʻō is prized by the hunter

Welo lua ē ka hulu nani i ka laʻi Feathers shimmer as sun-gold on a calm sea—
I ke ani mālie a ka Moaʻe Equally beautiful in the gently blowing Moaʻe

Hoʻoipo i ke oho o ka lehua To love amidst the delicate soft brush of lehua—
ʻAʻohe lua ke ʻike aku Nothing equal is known

Puana ke aliʻi hulu mamo Proclaim the mamo-feathered chief
Kalanipō ʻo ʻoe, e ō mai You are Kalanipō, answer

 

Arrangement: Keola Beamer
Vocals: Raiatea Helm
Vocals, Kī Hōʻalu Guitar (Keola’s Eb played in C minor), ‘Ohe Hano Inu: Keola Beamer
Kāʻekeʻeke:  Moanalani Beamer

“Ke Aliʻi Hulu Mamo” was written by Helen Desha Beamer, Keola’s great-grandmother, to honor Princess Kahanu Kaleiwohi Kaʻauwai Kalanianaʻole, a family friend and president of the Kaʻahumanu Society of which Helen was a charter member.

Keola’s concept for this piece was to musically visit the wao lipo, the deep rainforest that inspired his great-grandmother. Here, he uses a “pecking” sound on the guitar to emulate Hawaiʻi’s forest birds.

Princess Kahanu was a strong supporter of women’s organizations and promoted the idea that Hawaiʻi should be a place of aloha for all people. In a speech before the Native Sons and Daughters of Hawaiʻi in 1924, she said, “ʻO Hawaiʻi nei wale nō ka ʻāina hoʻokahi nāna e kūkala nei i ka noho lōkahi pū ʻana o nā lāhui o ka Hikina me ke Komohana, a ʻo kaʻu leo paipai wale nō iā ʻoukou, e nā hoa hānau aloha, e hoʻomau ʻia ka hana maikaʻi a kākou e hōʻike aku nei i mua o ka lehulehu, no ke aloha i ka ʻāina o kākou i hānau ʻia ai. E hoʻohiolo aku i nā pā e kaupale ana i ka noho like ʻana o nā mea a pau ma luna o ko kākou ʻāina hānau.” (Hawaiʻi is the only place which can declare itself a land of harmonious existence for those from both the East and the West, and I implore you now, beloved cousins, to perpetuate the good work that we do in society, for the love of this land we know as our birthplace. Let us break down the walls that serve only to interfere with the co-existence of all people here in our homeland.”)

Raiatea went to spend some time with Mahi Beamer, the legendary singer, pianist, composer, and grandson musical protégé of Helen Desha Beamer. He helped her with the phrasing and musical interpretation of this song. Raiatea says, “Within all the instrumentation and background elements, I put myself in a place where I was back in time, back in ancient Hawaiʻi, like I was living in old Hawaiʻi. That’s what put me in the right space and it helped me adjust with the sound. It made me proud to be Hawaiian.”

The lyrics shown here are from the songbook “Songs of Helen Desha Beamer” by Marmionette K. Kaʻaihue.

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Days Of My Youth
(Kuiokalani Lee - Konakai Publishing/BMI) 3:24

Arrangement: Keola Beamer
Vocals, Kī Hōʻalu Guitar (Taro Patch G tuned down to F): Keola Beamer

Keola’s respect and admiration for Kui Lee as a musician and composer goes back to the days when Keola was a student at Kamehameha Schools on Oʻahu in 7th grade. Kui turned up at 7:30 in the morning for what was to be an assembly and performance in the large Kekūhaupiʻo auditorium. Unfortunately for Kui, the guitar player had forgotten about the gig, so Kui was left singing in front of all the students with only drums and a bass guitar to back him up. Nevertheless, Kui “just sang his heart out,” recounts Keola. “He pulled it off. The sound was bouncing all around, but you know, he showed up and pulled it off. He was young and he was cool. It made us kids feel proud to be Hawaiian.”

Keola believes that Kui Lee was one of Hawaiʻi’s best songwriters. “But there is a poignancy about his story too,” says Keola, referring to Lee’s untimely passing at the young age of 33, a victim of cancer. “He was cut short in the blossom of life, but thankfully his songs live on in us.”

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Kimo Hula
(Helen Desha Beamer) 4:17

Aia i ka uka o Piʻihonua In the uplands of Piʻihonua
Ke kīhāpai pua ulumāhiehie A flower garden in beautiful array
I laila au lā ‘ike i ka nani There I see the beauty
O nā pua ‘ala a he nui wale Of the flowers, fragrant, in great profusion

Hoʻohihi nā manu o ke kuahiwi The birds of the forest are attracted here
Nā ʻiʻiwi maka pōlena The yellow-eyed ʻiʻiwi
I ka ʻono i ka wai o nā pua At the sweet nectar of the flowers
ʻO Moanikeʻala i ka uluwehiwehi Of Moanikeʻala’s beautiful gardens

Mahalo iā ‘oe e ka hoaaloha Thank you dear friend
I ka hoʻokipa e nā malihini For gracious hospitality to visitors
Eia ko lei poina ‘ole Here is your unforgettable beloved
‘O Leimakani, Leionaona Leimakani, Leionaona

Haʻina ‘ia mai ana ka puana The story is told
Moanikeʻala i ka uluwehiwehi Moanikeʻala, beautifully verdant
Hea aku mākou, e ō mai ʻoe We call, you answer
Kimo o ka uka ‘iuʻiu he inoa Kimo of the highlands, your namesong

 

Arrangement: Raiatea Helm
Vocals, ʻUkulele: Raiatea Helm

This song was composed by Helen Desha Beamer while she was living in Hilo on Hawaiʻi island. It was written for her Scottish friend James Kimo Henderson (1876-1965) who lived at Piʻihonua, Hilo, in a beautiful and stately house and gardens collectively known as Moanikeʻala (which is honored in its own right in an Emma Nāwahī/Helen Desha Beamer song, “Moani Ke ʻAla”). Kimo was known for being both an astute businessman and a great philanthropist in the Hilo area, and was quite the dapper gentleman when seen around town dressed up in his favorite bow-tie and Woodrow Wilson hat. He owned and operated the sugar mill near downtown Hilo, on the corner of Kinoʻole and Pōnahawai Streets where the fire station now stands. The reference to Leimakani and Leionaona in the song is for Henderson’s wife, Lydia Lei Henderson (Macy).

The lyrics shown here are from the songbook “Songs of Helen Desha Beamer” by Marmionette K. Kaʻaihue.

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